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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Starting the car this morning, turned over, wouldn't start, low fuel light came on, and STRONG smell of fuel. Get out of the car to see fuel covering the garage floor. Further inspection revealed that when turning the key, and priming the pump, fuel sprays out from the topside of the tank. I don't have a direct line of sight to the spray, but I can only assume it's from the pump area.

1)Anyone else had this problem? Diagnosis?

2)Anyone pulled the tank on their G? I've replaced a pump before so pulling the tank/inspecting everything won't be completely new, just haven't done it on this model of car.

And as luck would have it, there's at least 100# of fuel in the car right now. Guess I could keep turning the key and lose it all on the floor :mad:
 

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If you're not under warranty then I suppose you just have to start taking things loose.

First thing's first...more than likely you have quick connects (have never messed witht he G6's connections). Stick your hand up there and feel around. Try to press the hose back onto whatever nozzle it's loose from or find a crack/cut/tear/hole. You might luck out and it just be a broken clip...which means a quick trip for a $0.25 plastic clip will get you back up and running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I wasted the morning with it, no luck. To even reach in and feel anything, the tank has to be lowered a little. I know a straight-shooter mechanic (whom is also a fellow biker) so I had it towed to his shop.

He called a little later and said "by feel" he believes its one of the tubes coming off the top of the pump, but won't know for certain until he drops the tank all the way (requires the rear portion of the exhaust to be moved out of the way).

For now, just in case, a new $350 pump/module assembly is on order, but I'm hoping he gets it apart to see its something much simpler (and cheaper).

On the bright side, the few days I go without driving it are a few days that I don't have to hear the front end pop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Follow-up:

Picked up my car late yesterday afternoon. Turns out there was a good sized hole in the line carrying the fuel out of the pump. So, while it wasn't the pump itself, GM's wonderful design of molding the line to the pump required me to spend $350 because a cheap plastic hose was punctured.

As to what caused it, still don't know. I suspect a curious squirrel sharpening his teeth on the line, but I'm not sure. No way anything/anyone else could have gotten to that location and caused the damage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I initially thought the same thing, but on the other end of that line is a special "quick coupling" that attaches to the line going to the fuel rail.

And I still wondered if the line could have possibly been "coupled" back together after cutting out the bad section, but according to the mechanic, this doesn't usually offer good results with this new plastic lines.

And keep in mind the pump is pushing around 100 psi of pressure. Which (again) makes me wonder what GM was thinking when they designed this system.

I'm still beside myself as to how this happens sitting in the garage.
 

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Ok, so this is what I have found. For weeks I was smelling fuel on my 2006 G6, whether it was after driving or just sitting all night. It was terrible. I made several calls and did all the research I could and a GM mechanic told me the pump possibly had a crack and needed to be replaced for $800. So I got on EBay and bought one for $45. Me and a friend jacked the car up, pulled the tank and pulled the pump out of the tank...(yes the pump and filter are in the tank.) We figured out that the fuel was not leaking from the pump but from the metal gasket ring that locks in on top of the tank. Since i already had the slightly used pump from EBay, I went ahead and replaced it and put high temp sensor safe RTV silicone underneath that metal gasket before snaping it back in place. To finish a long story, I have not smelled gas in 5 days since doing this work!
 

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ive been looking all over for some anseres to this. old thread i know but maybe a bump will help more.

so as far as taking the pump down could it be done at home after draining the tank?
Yes. I just did it in a buddies Saab 9-3. (Same platform as the G6) he ran the tank nearly empty and it really helped.
With a couple of jack stands and a helping hand you can manage it. Once you get the rear up you'll need to disconnect the fuel line. Evap line and the electrical connector. The lines should have quick disconnects on em.
you can use a jack to hold the tank as you undo the straps.
 
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