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After the car has been driven i get a really bad fuel smell. I'm checked for leaks and there aren't any. I got and check engine light and i brought it to autozone. i can't remember the code but it called out an EVAP problem. Since then the code has gone away. I ordered the purge solenoid and the vent solenoid and they should be in on friday. I just want to know if anyone else has had this problem and when i replace these parts if it will fix the problem?
 

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You need to replace your fuel pump module

Read through the G6 forum threads after smelling gas in the garage that houses my 2007 3.5L convertible and confirmed today what was reported and found that a hairline crack in the plastic elbow at the center top of the fuel tank that connects the fuel pump to the injector lines was the cause. As I sit in the dealership lobby typing this I thought I'd share this $800 experience with any interested.

Indicators: - strong fuel smell when kneeling behind vehicle when off and/or in trunk when parked in open; obvious fuel smellwhen garaged
- NO engine lights, decreased fuel economy, difficulty starting, visible fuel on ground, or other performance hit (note: after the smell persisting for several wks the car did take a bit longer than normal to start today, which simply indicates the insidious nature of this problem)
- if you have a check engine light or perf problem, then the hairline crack has expanded to a hole large enough to cause significant pressure loss

Cause: a hairline crack forms over time in the plastic elbow connecting the fuel pump (inside the tank) to the fuel lines leading to the front of the car. This elbow & line are under 60psi when primed with key on and contains residual pressure. This pressure forces gas and vapor to leak out of the ceven when car is turned off.

Solution: you need to replace the fuel pump module (note: the fuel system in the back of the car consists of the fuel pump module [integral pump, filter, lines, elbow], fuel level sensor, and tank module, ignoring the tank fill port and neck). Do not try a cheap fix as the highly flamable vapor is next to the hot exhaust pipes and, if garaged, possibly in proximity to your gas water heater pilot light. Best to have fixed professionally for $800 ($500 fuel pump module, $300 labor), but you can buy the ac delco part for $300 and replace by yourself.
 

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Read through the G6 forum threads after smelling gas in the garage that houses my 2007 3.5L convertible and confirmed today what was reported and found that a hairline crack in the plastic elbow at the center top of the fuel tank that connects the fuel pump to the injector lines was the cause. As I sit in the dealership lobby typing this I thought I'd share this $800 experience with any interested.

Indicators: - strong fuel smell when kneeling behind vehicle when off and/or in trunk when parked in open; obvious fuel smellwhen garaged
- NO engine lights, decreased fuel economy, difficulty starting, visible fuel on ground, or other performance hit (note: after the smell persisting for several wks the car did take a bit longer than normal to start today, which simply indicates the insidious nature of this problem)
- if you have a check engine light or perf problem, then the hairline crack has expanded to a hole large enough to cause significant pressure loss

Cause: a hairline crack forms over time in the plastic elbow connecting the fuel pump (inside the tank) to the fuel lines leading to the front of the car. This elbow & line are under 60psi when primed with key on and contains residual pressure. This pressure forces gas and vapor to leak out of the ceven when car is turned off.

Solution: you need to replace the fuel pump module (note: the fuel system in the back of the car consists of the fuel pump module [integral pump, filter, lines, elbow], fuel level sensor, and tank module, ignoring the tank fill port and neck). Do not try a cheap fix as the highly flamable vapor is next to the hot exhaust pipes and, if garaged, possibly in proximity to your gas water heater pilot light. Best to have fixed professionally for $800 ($500 fuel pump module, $300 labor), but you can buy the ac delco part for $300 and replace by yourself.
Excellent post. Any chance of getting a picture of the crack?
 

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Me too

Wow, I've been smelling fuel too. I will park the car, go to work and when I get back in, I smell fuel. I was thinking it could be due to the empty gallon gas container in the trunk. But I was thinking, "Could this little empty container really be causing this smell?" I will remove the container, freshen up the car with Febreeze and see how it is in the morning. I am glad I saw this...just in case.

I swear it seems like something is always wrong with this car.
 

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GM Stood up (after some prodding)

So it's been a few months since my original posting and I wanted to update if for no other reason than to provide hope for those w/ the same problem (and that's a LOT of Pontiac owners.
After having the dealership replace the defective pump assembly I decided to call GM's/Pontiac's customer care line. Following two weeks of frustration speaking w/ multiple support staff in some South or South East Asian country I was told (in broken English) that my warranty had expired and there was nothing GM could do.
Feeling that there was a cultural misunderstanding I decided to write a personal letter to GM HQ in Michigan. The Americans who work for GM understood the safety implications of this insidious problem and w/in a week of sending the letter I received a phone call from GM (Americans). They agreed to look into the fuel pump assembly design and consider notifications to registered owners. Whether their investigation will point to recall or notification action is unknown, but all I could do was ask. They also agreed to reimburse me for the repair. (Minor note: reimbursement had to be made through the warranty system which meant the dealership received the check which should have subsequently been sent to me. Four weeks in and having not received the check, I phoned GM again. They were concerned and called the dealership's Warranty Manager. He apologized for having "accidentally misplaced the check under a stack of papers" and agreed to mail it to me.)
One last point: I'm not anti-foreigner, but American companies that set up customer service call centers in foreign countries need to do a better job teaching American culture, norms, and standards to their employees. It's not enough to ensure only language competence IMHO.
In any event, I hope this thread helps those out there w/ this problem and alerts those who will.
 

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Did that a month ago with no results. Since complaints go into a massive database, I doubt it will be reviewed anytime soon, if at all. Probably need everyone with this problem to complain before it gets their attention. But you're right on notifying NHTSA. Thx.
 

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GM had a recall on wiper quitting anytime, My daughters 95 wasn't covered. I complained to NHTSA saying how would you like to have your wipers quit passing a 18 wheeler in the rain.
About 1 year later her's year was added to the recall, I had fixed it long ago.
 

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Gas smell - 2009 Pontiac G6

Read through the G6 forum threads after smelling gas in the garage that houses my 2007 3.5L convertible and confirmed today what was reported and found that a hairline crack in the plastic elbow at the center top of the fuel tank that connects the fuel pump to the injector lines was the cause. As I sit in the dealership lobby typing this I thought I'd share this $800 experience with any interested.

Indicators: - strong fuel smell when kneeling behind vehicle when off and/or in trunk when parked in open; obvious fuel smellwhen garaged
- NO engine lights, decreased fuel economy, difficulty starting, visible fuel on ground, or other performance hit (note: after the smell persisting for several wks the car did take a bit longer than normal to start today, which simply indicates the insidious nature of this problem)
- if you have a check engine light or perf problem, then the hairline crack has expanded to a hole large enough to cause significant pressure loss

Cause: a hairline crack forms over time in the plastic elbow connecting the fuel pump (inside the tank) to the fuel lines leading to the front of the car. This elbow & line are under 60psi when primed with key on and contains residual pressure. This pressure forces gas and vapor to leak out of the ceven when car is turned off.

Solution: you need to replace the fuel pump module (note: the fuel system in the back of the car consists of the fuel pump module [integral pump, filter, lines, elbow], fuel level sensor, and tank module, ignoring the tank fill port and neck). Do not try a cheap fix as the highly flamable vapor is next to the hot exhaust pipes and, if garaged, possibly in proximity to your gas water heater pilot light. Best to have fixed professionally for $800 ($500 fuel pump module, $300 labor), but you can buy the ac delco part for $300 and replace by yourself.
Hello dnjp1808,
From what I'm reading it sounds like I'm having the same problem. I was wondering if you replaced the module yourself and if so how easy was it? I'm not getting any warning lights, just the hard starting when it's cold - takes a couple cranks. Of course when I took it to an AAMCO shop, they couldn't determine exactly what the problem was because the car started EVERYTIME - cold, hot, whatever (they had it for about 3 days). The best the can say is a leaking fuel pump but again they couldn't confirm this. We've also noticed a considerable drop I gas milege which is probably due to this issue. Am I understanding correctly that the fuel pump module is different than the actual fuel pump? I'm not a "car guy" - more of a "motorcycle guy".

Thanks
 

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I never did tank drop yet. I have noticed all the electrical and fuel connectors are on the bottom, easily accessible.
I would use a floor jack if I was to do one. I would run it up on ramps for working room.
 
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