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Discussion Starter #1
Searched, but didn't find any solution so I'm creating a new thread.

2007 G6 Sedan (2.4L) with a P1174 (Fuel Trim Cylinder Balance) code. Came on about 3 months ago for the same problem, took it to the dealer and they replaced the fuel injectors and did a fuel system treatment. 3 months later, same code comes up. Replaced both O2 sensors and code went off (again at dealer). 800 miles later, code is back. Anyone know what this could be this time?

I've got an extended warranty with a $100 deductible, but this is getting time consuming and expensive if it costs me $100 every 800 miles with no solution. No problems with driveability that I've noticed that would indicate a major vaccuum leak. No rough idling, hesitation, etc. Acceleration is still good. I'll check the MPGs on the way to work tomorrow.

Every time the code has come on it's been when I'm on the freeway driving to work (I live 30 miles away, highway the entire way).

Basically, the Autozone printout gives a list of about 4 causes, almost all of which have been eliminated to this point.

1.) Heated O2 Sensors --> Replaced
2.) Ignition problem
3.) Fuel injector problem --> replaced
4.) Engine mechanical

Since the other two (ignition problem and engine mechanical) aren't very specific, I'd like to get an idea of what it is before the dealer just goes in there and places band-aids on the problem without really fixing it (at $100 a pop each time) because they don't know what's wrong either.
 

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An 1174 all by itself can be a real PITA to solve. Lucky you have warranty coverage. I assume they've leak-tested her & reflashed the ECM to the latest version firmware. Your MPG is probably going to be down somewhat due to more fuel being dumped into the cylinders to correct a real or perceived lean condition. Here are some more possible causes:

•Inspect the air induction system for modified, damaged, leaking, or restricted components.
•Inspect the crankcase ventilation system for improper operation.
•Inspect the vacuum hoses for splits, kinks, and improper connections.
•Inspect for vacuum leaks at the intake manifold, the throttle body, and the injector O-rings.
•Test for a restricted, damaged, leaking, or modified exhaust system from the catalytic converter forward.
•Test the ignition system for improper operation.
•Test the engine for any mechanical conditions such as sticking valves, lifters, etc., which could alter the flow into the combustion chamber.
 

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Moderator Member Thingy
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Why are you paying $100 for each trip to the dealership? Shouldn't you only have to pay once until it is truly fixed?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Why are you paying $100 for each trip to the dealership? Shouldn't you only have to pay once until it is truly fixed?
I'm no warranty expert but that's a good point. Warranty work is generally guaranteed for 12 months.
The $100 is the deductible on my extended warranty. You would think I wouldn't have to pay it each time, but when they fix a different thing each time, it's techinically a "different problem." Yes, warranty work is guaranteed for 12 months, on that specific repair. So, the injectors are warrantied for 12 months, the O2 sensors are now warrantied for 12 months, but if it's an ignition problem or a vac leak, that's not covered under the previous repair so techinically it would be a "new repair" even though it's the same error code.

The car repair business is about the only industry that can get away with some thing like that. It's like performing completely unnecessary surgery that doesn't fix the underlying problem and charging you for it anyway.
 
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