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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I have added LEDs to all of my doors and I wanted to tap into the power window switch's positive and negative wires, but seeing there a four wires and all untraditional colors I was not sure what to do, could anyone tell me the answer? Thank you much
 

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So I realize now that due to the body control unit I probably want to avoid stealing power there. Anybody run wires through the door to the frame yet? Just wondering how difficult it will be to get the wire through the rubber door hose and accessing it next to the seat.
 

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If you are talking about the huge rubber seal on the body, and running a wire from outside to inside then, Yes I can help a lil. To pop off that rubber seal from the frame squeeze the top and bottom together to release the clip and it should puul right off. Now you will only get about 3 inches of play which is enough to run a wire through. I used it to run my underglow LED kit wires, and worked perfect with no leaks. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I am talking about the rubber hose that runs from the door to the frame, in which the window control wires are ran.
 

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So I realize now that due to the body control unit I probably want to avoid stealing power there. Anybody run wires through the door to the frame yet? Just wondering how difficult it will be to get the wire through the rubber door hose and accessing it next to the seat.
I'm running my A/C vent LEDs off the BCM dimming output, and at the moment there are 84 of them, so it wouldn't be a problem if you added a couple.

The illumination is on terminals A and B of the power window switches. The A terminal is ground and the B terminal is connected to the dimming control circuit.

Click here for the power window switch illumination schematic (PDF).

~ MattInSoCal
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Correction. Five wires. Purple, brown, greenish, two blue that I can't tell if they're different or the same? I see the a terminal with a blue wire but b is not being used apparently
 

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Ok, so I remembered I paid for a subscription to that eautorepair website over a year ago, and I went looking for a wiring diagram. Now, I have the diagram, and no idea how to read it, if anyone could elaborate?

I circled the area in question.
 

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Ok, so I remembered I paid for a subscription to that eautorepair website over a year ago, and I went looking for a wiring diagram. Now, I have the diagram, and no idea how to read it, if anyone could elaborate?
I circled the area in question.
And so I assume I don't need to answer the PM...

OK, so the bad news on the sedans is that GM did not provide the lighting wire for the rear doors. For the front passenger door, the lighting wires are on terminals B and C in you diagram (The loopy thing in the rectangle to the left of your circle is the light bulb filament), which are the Gray (GRY) and Black (BLK) wires.

If you don't mind your LEDs being on whenever the ACCessory supply is active, meaning they would be on day or night, you can do this without adding any extra wires. Connect the positive lead of your LEDs to the Dark Blue (DK BLU) wire on terminal A according to your diagram, and the negative terminal to either the Dark Blue wire on terminal G or the Brown (BRN) wire on terminal F. By the way, with this scheme the LEDs would be off if you lock out the window controls from the driver's control panel, and in one direction of travel while the window is moving. This is because you are "stealing" the missing ground connection through the window motor, and when the window is not moving both terminals are connected (by the switches) to ground.

~ MattInSoCal
 

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Ok, thank you. Aren't one of those wires connected to the dimmer switch somehow?
For the rear seat, no they are not. Ignore what the diagram seems to be telling you. I wish they were as I would like to light up those switches (and I just may some day).

~ MattInSoCal
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ok. So I can add the negative to terminal g or f and it makes no difference? And then I suppose the window lock rocker switch would be my control switch in a sense? Thanks for the help by the way I have been tryin to figure this out for a little while now, lol.
 

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Ok. So I can add the negative to terminal g or f and it makes no difference?
Yes. If you follow the wires through the diagram, you would see that in their resting position that the window switches connect both sides of the motor to ground, so it doesn't matter which wire you connect to.

And then I suppose the window lock rocker switch would be my control switch in a sense?
Yes.

Thanks for the help by the way I have been tryin to figure this out for a little while now, lol.
No problem, the solution didn't even occur to me until I was looking closer at the diagram last night.

~ MattInSoCal
Earning my title
 

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Well now I've hit another wall, lol. They worked fine with a 9v test run, and they worked fine installed to the 12v for about twenty mins then nothin. Two of my LEDs no longer work even when connected to a battery alone. I had a 360 ohm resistor in a circuit with three 1.7 watt 3000 mcd 20a LEDs. Any ideas?
 

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Well now I've hit another wall, lol. They worked fine with a 9v test run, and they worked fine installed to the 12v for about twenty mins then nothin. Two of my LEDs no longer work even when connected to a battery alone. I had a 360 ohm resistor in a circuit with three 1.7 watt 3000 mcd 20a LEDs. Any ideas?
Yeah, hope you enjoyed that light while it lasted, and I hope you like your LEDs cooked to well done.

Sorry everyone, it's time for a little math, if that offends you move along to another post.

Something seems a little off in your specs for the LEDs. I'm thinking that perhaps they are 1.7 Volt, 20 ma (milliamps, thousandths of an Amp). Those are probably pretty accurate values for a 3000 mcd LED since 1.7 Watts would be a really bright LED and 20 Amps is an awful lot of current. We will continue this discussion based on my assumptions.

To calculate the correct value for a resistor, you need to know several things. One is how much voltage you are expecting to drop with the resistor, since the LED needs to run at a much lower voltage. The next is how much current is expected to be available/limited. The third which will be used later is to calculate how much power the resistor has to handle (dissipate).

To find a resistance value, we use Ohm's Law, which tells us that:

Resistance = Voltage / Current​

When performing the Voltage part of the calculation, always start with the maximum voltage that will be supplied (we will ignore short voltage spikes in this instance). So, in the G6 the maximum voltage is 14.6 Volts with the engine running and the voltage regulator in the alternator supplying maximum voltage (there was a note about this in the owner's manual). So, on to the math.

The voltage that needs to be dropped will be the maximum voltage (14.6) minus the operational voltage that the LED needs. According to the assumption made earlier, that works out as 14.6 - 1.7 = 12.9 Volts. You didn't mention if you are using one resistor per LED but since you are putting them in each door I will assume that is true. If you were running multiple LEDs with one resistor the math changes, and the wiring could get messy.

OK, we have a voltage drop of 12.9 Volts, and a current of 20 ma or 0.020 Amps. Using Ohm's law we get:

Resistance = Voltage / Current
Resistance = 12.9 / 0.020
Resistance = 645 ohms

Reversing the math, we learn that you fed as much as 36 ma or about 75% more than the rated current to your LEDs using the 390 Ohm resistor, which would have resulted in a nice, bright light for up to a couple of minutes with the LEDs eventually fading out. With the 9 Volt battery you were running them at about 25 ma which would look pretty normal at first but over the period of several weeks to several years the LEDs would get darker as they decayed. Of course the battery would go dead first... but I digress.

Ok, just a little tidying up to do. 645 Ohms is not a common value for resistors, but 680 Ohms is. That will give you about 19 ma of current maximum, which is nice and safe and still gives you bright light. When choosing a resistor value for something like this you always want to go to a higher resistance value to keep the current in the safe zone. Next is the power rating for the resistor.

Power = Voltage * Current
Power = 12.9 (drop across the resistor) * 0.020
Power = 0.258 Watts
You need to use a 1/2 Watt-rated resistor (commonly available) as the 1/4 Watt (0.250 Watt) resistors you might be supplied can't be relied on to not overheat and go bad over time. Also when installing the resistor keep it away from anything that can melt like plastic sheeting or door components. 1/2 Watt is not a lot of heat but over time it can cause some damage.

Class dismissed.

~ MattInSoCal
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ok 20a was a typo I'm on an iPhone not a computer. Moving on, I used the resistor calculator which said 390ohm 0.23 watt resistor for a series of three. Now I might have misunderstood their meaning. Are you saying in a closed circuit containing the three LEDs I should have one 690 ohm resistor before the first led positive connection, or one 690 ohm resistor before each individual led in the circuit?
 

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Ok 20a was a typo I'm on an iPhone not a computer. Moving on, I used the resistor calculator which said 390ohm 0.23 watt resistor for a series of three. Now I might have misunderstood their meaning. Are you saying in a closed circuit containing the three LEDs I should have one 690 ohm resistor before the first led positive connection, or one 690 ohm resistor before each individual led in the circuit?
The example I gave you is for one LED individually wired to one door connector. If you have three LEDs in series from the same power supply:

Power---Resistor---LED--LED--LED----Ground​

Then your resistor would be

Resistance = 14.6 -(1.7 + 1.7 +1.7) / 0.020
Resistance = 9.5 / 0.20 = 475 ohms​

You could use a 470 ohm resistor and it should be safe, a 510 would be the next higher common value and wouldn't have a big affect on the light output.

Are you putting three LEDs in each door, or something like that?

Edit: remember to use the maximum value of 14.6 Volts, not 13.8 or 12 if using an online calculator.

~ MattInSoCal
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Yes, I am putting three LEDs in each door, I hadn't thought about the maximum power being over 12v so that certainly clears it up. I figure at 12v the 390ohm wouldve worked but I can see the error. Also, should I go with a 470 ohm 1/8 or 1/4 watt if I'm putting one per door per three LEDs?
 

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Yes, I am putting three LEDs in each door, I hadn't thought about the maximum power being over 12v so that certainly clears it up. I figure at 12v the 390ohm wouldve worked but I can see the error. Also, should I go with a 470 ohm 1/8 or 1/4 watt if I'm putting one per door per three LEDs?
From my post above:

Power = Voltage * Current​

Thus:

Power = 9.5 (drop across the resistor) * 0.020
Power = 0.190 Watts​

Use at least a 1/4 Watt resistor.

~ MattInSoCal
 
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